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Video: How to Read a Pet Food Label

How to Read a Pet Food Label - Pet Supplies, Pet Food, and Pet Products from petco.com
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How to Read a Pet Food Label

Length: 2:49 Added: Jun-16 Views: 2213

With the wealth of the dog food options on the market today, finding the optimum formula for your pet is more achievable than ever.

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With the wealth of the dog food options on the market today, finding the optimum formula for your pet is more achievable than ever.

With the wealth of dog food options on the market today, finding the optimum formula for your pet is more achievable than ever. The following tips will help you pick just the right formula for your furry friend. First, you'll want to select the food that matches the life stage of your dog, whether he's a puppy, adult, or senior. Next, consider her dog's unique needs, such as activity level, weight, breed, or food sensitivity. For example, is your dog active or does he need to trim some weight? Formulas are specifically designed to meet a dog's needs based on these varying factors. Now, when it comes to understanding food labels, the words used and the order in which ingredients are listed speak volumes about what's in the product. Let's take a look at some popular naming conventions. Labels that lead off with a particular ingredient like chicken large breed puppy food must contain at least 95% of the named animal protein ingredient, in this case, chicken. If there's more than one animal protein ingredient in the name, as in beef, chicken, and liver dog food, the named ingredients combined must make up 95% of the total weight. And the product will have more of the first ingredient named and diminishing quantities of the ingredients that follow. Labels that combine food ingredients with words like dinner, formula, platter, or entree, must contain at least 25% of the named ingredients. For example, beef dinner for dogs will have 25% beef. If more than one food ingredient is named, as in, lamb and brown rice entree, then the combination of the names ingredients must total 25% of the product. And each named ingredient must be at least 3% of the total. A label using the word "with" in its name must have at least 3% of the named ingredient in the product. For example, dog food with beef has 3% beef. Don't confuse this with labels that list the main food ingredient first as in, beef dog food, which has 95% beef. For labels touting flavor, no specific ingredient percentage is required. But the product must have enough of the named flavor substance to be detected by pets that prefer that flavor. Just as with people food, freshness is important. But nothing on the label can tell you the freshness of being used. So you'll have to rely on brand trust. Look for brands with a money back guarantee, or ask your vet for a recommendation. If you follow these guidelines, you'll be sure to find the best food for your pet in no time.

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